Andy and odd socks go back to school

0
115

Andy Day the CBeebies children’s TV presenter, last week returned to Romford, his home town to perform at his old primary school.

Andy and his band ‘Andy and The Odd socks’, played at Andy’s old school Ardleigh Green Primary school, to highlight anti bullying week. Andy told The Enquirer: “This was my first time back at the school since I left and it was great being back their and performing our songs with the band.”

Andy, who is the patron for the Anti-Bullying Alliance fronts the hugely successful Odd Socks Day, which annually sees thousands of children nationwide wear their odd socks to school in a public celebration of individuality.

‘Choose Respect’ is the theme chosen by The Anti Bullying Alliance for this year’s Anti-Bullying Week in schools, and Andy and his band, Andy and the Odd Socks, have written the official song to promote this message in primary schools.

Andy performed a number of songs for the pupils who loved them and had a chance to meet up with his old Headteacher Mr Morris.
Andy added: “It was so good to meet up with Mr Morris again, he’s been at the school for twenty seven years now, a testament to how good he is.
“The song encompasses everything that Odd Socks Day is about an amazing fun day, full of humour and inclusivity.

Odd socks

“It’s a fantastic opportunity for children to express themselves and celebrate their individuality and what makes us all unique. There’s no pressure on the children to wear the latest fashion or for parents to buy expensive costumes. All they have to do to take part is wear odd socks to school.”

The Anti-Bullying Alliance (ABA) is a unique coalition of organisations and individuals, who work together to reduce bullying and create safer environments in which children. ABA is hosted by the National Children’s Bureau.

Locals in Havering came out to show their support of anti-bullying week and wore odd socks and even odd shoes to work for the day.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here