Spring blooms new foals

Spring foal
Spring foal

A college has been brought to life in recent weeks with the arrival of daffodils, lambs and now their first foal of the season.

The filly, by Cevin Z, was born on Wednesday, 21 March and is the first to arrive at the Writtle University Colleges (WUC), brand new Lordships Stud facility, located at its equine campus, the Cow Watering Campus.

The naming of foals at WUC is a tradition involving students, who vote for their preferred category of names.

Names

The most popular category is then used to name all of the foals born that season so they have a theme. This year’s choices include Game of Thrones, Harry Potter, Gemstones, Shakespeare and Cocktails.

WUC recently held an Equine Showcase to mark the opening of its new £2million equine facilities and hundreds of visitors had the opportunity to see the mares first-hand prior to the foals being born.

Caroline Flanagan, Head of Higher Education Equine and Veterinary Physiotherapy, said: “It is a really exciting time of year. It provides a fantastic opportunity for our students to see and experience what it is like to breed horses as part of their course. They work closely with our expert staff and receive a fascinating insight into the world of equine reproduction and stud management.

“We are proud of our track record. It’s wonderful to see the horses being born and raised on campus by our staff and students and then going off to develop a successful competitive career.

“This filly is the first of six foals expected this year. We’re looking forward to meeting the rest of them.”
Third year BSc (Hons) Equine Performance and Business Management student Rose Sheehan from Ireland, said: “It is a great experience to be able to assist in the foaling of mares at university.

“I was involved as part of a team which consisted of sitting up duties through the night. This is where we undertake activities including checking the mares for signs of progression and imminent signs of parturition.

“We are also involved in assisting the mare in giving birth and the aftercare of both the mare and foal. This is extremely important in preparation for working within the equine industry.”

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